Black Bear Irish Stew

Stew was an important meal in Irish history, along with the ingredients found in the traditional dish. A can of dark beer is used to darken the broth and add roasted barley flavor.

Hunters making Irish stew can’t go wrong with neck, hock, flank, or even cubed center, or eye of round roasts. Black bear will stew down to tender morsels that make superb gravy. Make sure to cook a large portion of stew, as it is always better the second day, so you should plan for leftovers—in Irish fashion.  Be sure to add this to your favorite wild game recipes.

Ingredients

2 lbs. stew meat cut into 1-inch cubes

2 cups beef broth (can use 2 cups of water with 1 Tbsp. beef bouillon)

1 can dark beer (preferably Guinness)

3 cups sliced carrots

1 ½ cups chopped onion

4 cups cubed red potatoes (cut about same size as meat pieces)

½ cup sliced celery

1 cup peas (frozen or fresh)

3 Tbsp. chopped parsley

2 Tbsp. Worcestershire Sauce

1/2 tsp. salt

½ tsp. pepper

¾ cup all-purpose flour

3 Tbsp. canola or vegetable oil

In a sealable plastic bag, combine flour, salt, and pepper. Add meat cubes, seal bag and shake until the meat is coated. Heat oil in a 6-quart pot or Camp Chef Dutch oven and brown meat over medium-high heat for 8 minutes.

Stir in remaining ingredients, add liquids, cover the pot, and bring to a slow boil. Reduce heat to low and cover. Let the stew simmer for 1 ½ hours or until meat and vegetables are tender. Stir occasionally to prevent any portion from sticking to your pot or getting overcooked.

This stew recipe is a great recipe for any hunting camp. A Weston vacuum sealer can be used to bag and take your stew to camp frozen or ready to reheat. The Weston sealer bags can simply be placed in boiling water to reheat the stew, reducing the amount of cleanup at the end of the meal. And the water to boil can be used to wash the day’s dishes.

Born Hunting  readers can receive 25% off game processing equipment, including vacuum sealers and bags, at https://westonbrands.com, by entering BFENSON21 when asked for a code at checkout.

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